Tag Archive for 'Tri-State'

Tri-State files legal challenge on Clean Power Plan

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. filed a legal challenge to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan by filing a Petition for Review with the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Tri-State, the wholesale power supplier to 44 member electric cooperatives and public power districts across the West, is also participating in motions for stay of the rule filed by a large group of states, trade organizations, utilities, energy producers and business interests.

Even as Tri-State works constructively with the states to develop state plans under the new rule, strong arguments exist to show EPA exceeded its legal authority and many of the requirements of the rule are legally flawed.

During the federal rulemaking process, Tri-State and many of its member systems raised legal and technical issues about the proposal and expressed concerns the rule would be unworkable and unenforceable. The EPA did little to address these concerns and issued a final rule, which prompted the legal challenge.

Tri-State appreciates the efforts of attorneys general across the country who have asked to stay implementation of the rule until all of the legal issues are resolved. A stay of the rule is warranted because of the irreparable harm that will occur long before the compliance obligations go into effect. Utilities are often required to comply with a rule and forced to make long-term decisions well before the legal process concludes.

While pursuing legal challenges to the federal rule, Tri-State is also committed to working with officials in the five states in which it operates to develop required state plans and minimize the impact these state plans have on its members and rural electricity consumers.

Tri-State addresses carbon emissions by maintaining highly efficient power plants, investing in renewable energy and supporting research and development. In 2014, 24 percent of the energy delivered by Tri-State and its member systems was from renewable resources, and the association’s renewable power supply will grow by another 281 megawatts with the completion of four wind and solar projects by 2017. Tri-State also supports progressive energy efficiency programs offered by its member systems.

In addition to Tri-State’s renewable energy resources and energy efficiency programs, fossil fuel resources remain essential to serve load, maintain reliability and manage power costs for its members.

Tri-State is the wholesale power supplier, operating on a not-for-profit basis, to 44 member electric distribution systems that serve 1.5 million members throughout 200,000 square miles of Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico and Wyoming. Tri-State has operations in five states, including Arizona.

 

Watch “The people behind the power” mining video

Miner&son250Tri-State takes a great deal of pride in the men and women who safely and efficiently operate its mines in Colorado. Take a look at this short video (less than 7 minutes) and learn more about how these miners, their families and the local community business owners view the operations at Tri-State’s coal mines and the important role that they play in helping us keep the lights on for thousands of consumers across the West.

DMEA donates fresh 4-H meat to local food banks

DMEAmeatshare250Fresh food is a rare commodity at food banks, but two pantries in Colorado received a special treat recently when Tri-State member, Delta-Montrose Electric Association (Montrose, Colo.), donated hundreds pounds of fresh meat to help feed families in the region.

As shown in the photo to the left, DMEA board members Bill Patterson (left) and Kyle Martinez (right) helped delivered 320 pounds of lamb and pork to Michelle Overmyer of Sharing Ministries in Montrose. In addition, the co-op also donated about 350 pounds of bacon and sausage to the Hotchkiss Community Methodist Church Food Bank worth about $700.

The donated meat is farm fresh, straight from junior 4H Livestock shows at local county fairs. The co-op also paid a local plant to process the meat.

“This year, by donating the meat we were able to make our support go further in our community and impact members we may have not have reached before,” said Becky Mashburn, the co-op’s marketing and public relations administrator.

Sharon Teter, of the Hotchkiss Food Bank, said it will take about two months to distribute the meat; the bank serves about 340 families every two months in the four communities that it serves.

The remainder of the pork and sausage, which went to Montrose Sharing Ministries, is being distributed to local families in need. “We distribute one pound of meat per person, or two, if we have an abundance of meat, which isn’t very often,” said Kathi Crandall of the Montrose Sharing Ministries. “It’s very exciting when we get meat donated like we got from DMEA,” she added.

 

Telcom team stays sharp with continuous training

telecom250Safety is always a key area of focus for Tri-State, as evidenced through the continuous safety training Tri-State teams complete. And in support of that goal, the telecommunications crews recently completed their annual telecom tower rescue certification.

“The tower rescue training is required before the teams can work on the towers,” said Jaime Leal, transmission maintenance manager, east.

Over the course of two weeks, teams from each of the regions came together for small-group training on the rescue techniques they would use in the event there was an emergency while a team member was on the tower.

The training was a success, thanks to the teamwork of Marty Burrier, field training specialist; the telecom maintenance superintendents from all regions: Joey Livingston from the east, Tommy Chavez from the south and Jerry Quinn from the west; and all of the participants.

Tom Penner, journey level lineman, and Clint White, field training specialist, also contributed to the training, having recently conducted Tri-State’s fall protection training for the transmission maintenance teams.

“Tom and Clint came out to help everyone get comfortable with the new rescue devices—helping everyone to be more efficient and safe,” said Leal.

One EPA rule, a million concerns

Jo-Ann-Emerson-May-2014-1-MugshotOne million comments and counting. That’s the mark set by electric co-ops concerned that EPA’s carbon dioxide rule will increase costs and impair grid reliability. [Read more from NRECA]

 

 

Colowyo Mine a strong supporter of youth recreation on its property

 

Colowyo Mine staff has supported youth hunts and recreation for groups like these since the 1990s.

Colowyo Mine staff has supported youth hunts and recreation for groups like these since the 1990s.

Owned and operated by Tri-State’s subsidiary Western Fuels-Colorado, the Colowyo Mine encompasses a vast tract of property that spans over nearly 140,000 acres of land.

This land supports not only one of Colorado’s largest surface coal mines, but also vast tracts of undisturbed land, abundant natural resources, diverse wildlife and a number of farming and ranching operations that are currently leasing land from the mine.

So, it comes as no surprise that as good stewards of the land and strong supporters of their surrounding communities, the mine staff has a long history of helping to sponsor and support youth recreation programs on mine property.

“Over the years, working with the Colorado Parks & Wildlife (CPW) staff and our land lessees, we have supported multiple supervised youth hunts on our property as well as other recreational events such as CPW’s “Cast and Blast” program, where local kids are given the opportunity to go fly fishing and trap shooting on Colowyo’s mine property,” said Tonia Folks, land specialist at the western Colorado mine.

In the latest sponsored youth hunt, held on mine property over the weekend of Oct 24-26, up to 10 young hunters enjoyed a successful outing in search of cow elk.

In late September, three local teens were selected to participate in the first mentored waterfowl hunt on mine property.  “Colowyo Mine and lessee Duke Duzik were gracious enough to offer us access to the Big Bottom property,“ said District Wildlife Officer Evan Jones in a recent Craig Daily Press article. “In addition, the generosity of my fellow officers and the Moffat County Youth 4-H shooting program all helped to provide these kids with an experience they will remember for the rest of their lives,” he added.

These supervised hunts are part of CPW’s Hunter Outreach Program, an ongoing effort to encourage women and youths to head outdoors and enjoy the state’s abundant natural resources.

“The next set of youth hunting adventures on mine property will be in December, when the CPW staff will assist local youths in harvesting cow elk,” said Folks.

Colowyo Mine is one of two fuel suppliers to Tri-State’s Craig Station. The mining operation employs about 220 people and is located approximately 10 miles north of Meeker, Colo.